After the Bomb House Rules

3-6 players; This game setting has been unlocked.
After the Bomb house rules, character creation, etc.
DM: Augur
AGM:Witchfinder
Discord: https://discord.gg/Ry4XwcXDcM
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After the Bomb House Rules

Post by Augur »

After the Bomb House Rules

  • These rules are applicable site-wide, and so apply to the After the Bomb dimension.
  • Any changes to the canonical After the Bomb meta-narrative whether through player action or GM fiat will be recorded in this thread.
  • Any clarifications, reiterations, or changes to After the Bomb rules which are not already covered will be recorded in this thread.
  • Characters made for this game are restricted to this dimension--no transfer to other dimensions.

Canonical Content Table of Contents
  1. Character Creation
  2. Character Sheet Templates
  3. Unified Skill List (canonical)
  4. Perception Modifiers
  5. Equipment (canonical)
  6. EP Menu & Fortune & Glory Tables
  7. The World of After the Bomb (canonical maps & setting info)
  8. Improvised Melee Weapons (canonical)
  9. Experience System for ATB
  10. Interludes
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Re: After the Bomb House Rules

Post by Augur »

Improvised Melee Weapons
While any character can pick up just about any object and use it as a weapon, any particularly large, particularly strong, or particularly large and strong character can do an amazing amount of damage with "improvised" weapons. Once hoisted, the character can either throw the improvised weapon, or swing it around. The bigger the character, the more leverage the character has to hoist and swing large objects . The very largest characters, even if their strength is undeveloped, can improvise with ex­tremely large and bulky items in combat.

Size Level 6 or less: The size of objects usable in combat de­pends entirely on their P.S., because the character is so small, it is extremely difficult to use any large improvised weapon. Even if their P.S. is great enough (Crushing Strength) to lift, say, a car, their small size makes it quite possible they'll start sinking into dirt, mud or sand, driven down by the sheer weight of the object. They can, however, use a piece of pipe, two-by-four, ta­ble chair and such items, all usually inflicting 2D6 damage (3D6 damage if especially heavy).
Size Level 7 to 10: Characters with Crushing Strength can wield the items listed below but are -2 to strike.
Size Level 11 to 14: Any character with Beastly Strength above 40 or Crushing Strength above 24 can wield the items listed be low, but is -I to strike.
Size Level 15 to 18: Any character with Beastly Strength above 35 or Crushing Strength above 22 can wield the items listed below.
Size Level 19 or greater: Any character with Beastly Strength above 30 or Crushing Strength above 20 can wield the items listed below.

Damage from big items used as a club or thrown:
Automobile or Truck Door or Fender: 6D6+P.S. bonus damage.
Automobile, Small: 2D4x10+P.S. bonus damage.
Automobile, Medium: 2D6x10+P.S. bonus damage.
Truck: 3D6x10+P.S. bonus damage.
Cinder Block, Concrete Pillar/Parking Curb, or Small Chunk of Wall: 4D6+P.S. bonus damage.
Couch, Bed or Door: 3D6+P.S. bonus damage.
Desk, Table or Filing Cabinet: 4D6+P.S. bonus damage.
Heavy Table or Chest of Drawers: 5D6+P.S. bonus damage.
House Door: Wood: 4D6+P.S. bonus damage. Metal/Security Door: 6D6+P.S. bonus damage.
Lamp Post or Tree: 6D6+P.S. bonus damage.
Mailbox or Telephone Booth: 3D6+P.S. bonus damage.
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Re: After the Bomb House Rules

Post by Augur »

Experience

Experience is rewarded on the same schedule as the rest of the site, but in a different manner.
Instead of the system used everywhere else on site, I intend to radically simplify this.
  • Assuming full participation for the entire quad, each character will receive 10 points. (Proportional rewards for partial quad participation.)
  • A minimum of 7 must be used for XP, but the player can also choose to use as many as 3 points to be allocated towards additional Bio-E.
  • Bio-E earned in this manner can be saved for later use, thus allowing a player to further develop his character's abilities.
  • At levels 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15 a character learns 2 new Secondary skills at 1st level proficiency.
XP & CHARACTER LEVELS
00-15: 1st level
16-30: 2nd level
31-45: 3rd level
46-60: 4th level
61-75: 5th level
76-90: 6th level
91-105: 7th level
106-120: 8th level
121-135: 9th level
136-150: 10th level
151-180: 11th level
181-210: 12th level
211-240: 13th level
241-270: 14th level
271-300: 15th level
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Re: After the Bomb House Rules

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EQUIPMENT

See attached PDF for available equipment & costs. Obviously ignore the stuff that's clearly inappropriate to the setting.
Gold Piece to Bucks price conversion is 1 GP: 1 Buck.

After the Bomb Equipment

Miscellaneous Gear

Common Prices
An overnight room in an inn, dinner & breakfast in­cluded Cost: 2 Bucks
A month's rent of a small house Cost: 30 Bucks
Doctor's treatment, with medicine Cost: 5 Bucks
An overnight bed in a hospital, with treatment. Cost: 20 Bucks
Entry to a public bathhouse, including towels & soap Cost: 2 Bits
A fine dinner for two, with good ale or wine Cost: 12 Bucks
A large loaf of fresh bread Cost: 1 Bit
A good sandwich Cost: 1 Bit
A 25 pound sack of flour, used for making bread Cost: 3 Bits
Custom-made wooden barrel, box or crate Cost: 1 to 3 Bucks
Waterproof duffle bag Cost: 2 Bucks
Leather backpack Cost: 5 Bucks
Lightweight vinyl backpack Cost: 15 Bucks
A waterproof sleeping bag (up to Size Level 12) Cost: 9 Bucks
A 10 by 10 by 8 foot tall waterproof tent Cost: 12 Bucks
A shovel, rake or hammer with a wood handle and steel head Cost: 2 Bucks
Custom-made lock with two sets of keys Cost: 2 to 8 Bucks
Custom-made handcuffs, fetters, leg irons or manacles, with chain Cost: 6 to 36 Bucks, depending on Size Level
A torch that will stay lit for 20 minutes Cost: 1 Bit
A battery-powered flashlight Cost: 50 Bucks
A flashlight battery Cost: 8 Bucks
Crank-powered flashlight Cost: 40 Bucks
A battery-powered radio, receiver only Cost: 125 Bucks
Spool of colored sewing thread, 300 feet, 25 Ibs test Cost: 2 Bits
Spool of fishing line, 300 feet, 250 Ibs test Cost: 4 Bucks
Spool of silver-white spider thread, 300 feet, 1,500 pound tests Cost: 20 Bucks
Length of Cotton or Wool Cord, 50 feet, 150 Ibs test Cost: 3 Bits
Length of nylon cord, 50 feet, 400 Ibs test Cost: 8 Bucks
Length of spider cord, 50 feet, 5,000 lbs test Cost: 40 Bucks
Coil of hemp/cotton rope, 500 feet, 500 Ibs test Cost: 20 Bucks
Coil of nylon climbing rope, 500 feet, 4,000 Ibs test Cost: 40 Bucks
CoiI of spider rope, 500 feet 20,000 Ibs test Cost: 200 Bucks
Yard of iron chain, 4,000 Ibs test Cost: 3 Bucks
Yard of steel chain, 12,000 Ibs test Cost: 8 Bucks
Farm labor daily wages Cost: 1 Buck
Factory labor daily wages Cost: 2 Bucks
Soldier's daily wages Cost: 2 Bucks, 2 Bits
Mine labor daily wages Cost: 3 Bucks
Skilled construction labor, including bricklayers & carpenters Cost: 5 Bucks
Professional labor Cost: 6 to 12 Bucks

Carts & Wagons
Simple Wooden Cargo Wagon (Small) Cost: 60-90 bucks
Simple Wooden Cargo Wagon (Medium) Cost: 100-125 bucks
Simple Wooden Cargo Wagon (Large) Cost: 130-180 bucks
Wood, Reinforced with Iron (Medium) Cost: 250-350 bucks
Wood, Reinforced with Iron (Large) Cost: 350-500 bucks
Wood and Lacquer Buck Board (Seats 2-4; plus small cargo area) Cost: 200-400 bucks
Fancy Coach or Sleigh (Medium; Seats 4-6) Cost: 300-500 bucks
Fancy Coach or Sleigh (Large; Seats 8-10) Cost: 500-1000 bucks

Tailored Clothing & Armor
Size Notes: Clothing and armor for very large characters re­quires more time, more material and a lot of custom work.
Size Level of 12 or less - Standard Price.
Size Level 13 through 15 - Standard Price +50%.
Size Level 16 through 18 - Standard Price x2.
Size Level 19 - Standard Price x3.
Size Level 20 - Standard Price x4.
Size Level 21 or greater - Standard Price x5.


Clothing
Socks, cotton or wool Cost: 1 Bit
Cotton underpants or undershirt Cost: 2 Bits
Wool sweater Cost: 1 Buck
Cloth or leather pants, custom-made Cost: 5 Bucks
Cloth shirt, ready-made Cost: 3 Bucks
Coveralls, cotton or wool Cost: 2 Bucks
Coveralls, winter & waterproof Cost: 3 Bucks
Gloves, winter wool Cost: 1 Buck
Gloves, custom-made leather Cost: 3 Bucks
Gloves, leather with metal reinforcement Cost: 5 Bucks
Leather Jacket, custom-made Cost: 6 Bucks
Leather Shoes, custom-made Cost: 3 Bucks
Leather Boots, custom-made Cost: 7 Bucks
A winter down-filled coat Cost: 7 Bucks

Custom Built Armor
Quilted or Padded Armor (A.R. 8, S.D.C. 15) Cost: 25 Bucks
Soft Leather Armor (A.R. 9, S.D.C. 20) Cost: 50 Bucks
Spider Silk Armor (A.R. 12, S.D.C. 150; lightweight) Cost: 250 Bucks
Studded Leather Armor (A.R. 12, S.D.C. 38) Cost: 80-100 Bucks
Chain Mail (A.R. 13, S.D.C. 50) Cost: 130-160 Bucks
Scale Mail (A.R. 15, S.D.C. 75) Cost: 200-250 Bucks
Plate and Mail (A.R. 15, S.D.C. 100) Cost: 270-340 Bucks
Plate Armor (A.R. 16, S.D.C. 150) Cost: 400-500 Bucks
Plastic Plated Armor (A.R. 13, S.D.C. 80) Cost: 300-400 Bucks

USE TEMPLATES SHOWN FOR GEAR DETAILS.

Code: Select all

[b]Armor Name[/b]
[size=85][list][*]Armor Rating: 
[*]S.D.C.: 
[*]Weight:
[*]Features:
[*]Modifiers: [/list][/size]
Note about Giant-Sized Weapons: Increase cost by 40% and add one additional die to the damage. Re­quires Brute Strength or better, and a P.S. of 24 to use a giant weapon.

USE TEMPLATES SHOWN FOR GEAR DETAILS.

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[b]Ranged Weapon's name[/b]
[size=85][list][*]Range:
[*]Damage:
[*]Rate of Fire:
[*]Payload:
[*]Weight:
[*]Features:
[*]Modifiers: [/list][/size]

Code: Select all

[b]Melee Weapon's name[/b]
[size=85][list][*]Range: Close Combat
[*]Damage:
[*]Weight:
[*]Features:
[*]Modifiers: [/list][/size]
Tailored Clothing & Armor
Size Notes: Clothing and armor for very large characters re­quires more time, more material and a lot of custom work.
Size Level of 12 or less - Standard Price.
Size Level 13 through 15 - Standard Price +50%.
Size Level 16 through 18 - Standard Price x2.
Size Level 19 - Standard Price x3.
Size Level 20 - Standard Price x4.
Size Level 21 or greater - Standard Price x5.



Arrows & Crossbow Bolts: Ammunition for bows and crossbows. These items are readily available, even in small villages, unless noted otherwise.
Target Arrow or Crossbow Bolt: Lightweight wood de­signed to be used on straw targets. While a target arrow or bolt does normal damage, it is usually broken or ruined when used in combat and range is 20% shorter.
Cost: 1 Bit each
Hunting Arrow. A durable arrow fitted with a razor sharp arrowhead meant to penetrate skin, muscle and flesh. Can be used over and over again, even after being fired into a victim. Does +1 damage.
Cost: 2 Bits each
War Arrow. A solid shaft is tipped with a dense, pointed ar­rowhead, designed for penetrating leather, wood, and even thin metal armor. Can be used repeatedly. Does +3 damage.
Cost: 4 Bits each
Incendiary Arrow. Trimmed with an inflammable treated cotton that will burn even in pouring ram. Incendiary arrows will keep burning for 1D4 minutes after being lit on fire. 01-65% likelihood of setting any combustible materials on fire.
Cost: 6-8 Bits each
Armor-Piercing Crossbow Bolt. Made of solid metal, with a tip designed to penetrate various kinds of armor. These metal bolts are easy to straighten and sharpen for re-use. Does +3 damage, but range is 30% less than usual.
Cost: 2 Bits each

Bow Weapons
Bow, Compound: Custom made for the character's size and strength. Made of composite layers of wood. When, and only when, the character is using a personalized compound bow, the P.S. bonus can be added to the damage. Range: 700 feet. Damage: 2D6.
Cost: 120-150 Bucks, 300 for a personalized bow.
Bow, Mechanical: This device, made of metal, with a sys­tem of gears and pulleys, allows for dead-on accuracy. Bonus: +1 to strike. Range: 600 feet. Damage: 2D6.
Cost: 225-300 Bucks
Bow, Portable: Designed to be completely disassembled, for storage in a foot-long box. Range: 250 feet. Damage: 2D4.
Cost: 80-120 Bucks
Bow, Traditional Wood (simple): This device is made of a single piece of wood and has a string pull of 35-50 Ibs; cheap and effective. Range: 400 feet, but can fire up to 500 feet at -2 to strike. Dam­age: 2D4.
Cost: 50-80 Bucks
Crossbow, Crank Action: Reloading is accomplished by turning a crank that pulls the drawstring back into place. Range: 600 feet. Damage: 3D6. Cost: 250-300 Bucks
Crossbow, Lever Action: Reloads by pulling a crank back­ wards, pulling the draw cord into place for the next bolt. Char­acter must have a minimum P.S. of 13 or better to reload. Range: 325 feet. Damage: 2D6.
Cost: 150-200 Bucks
Crossbow, Pistola: Can be fired with one hand. Character reloads by pulling the drawstring back into place. Range: 200 feet. Damage: 2D4. Cost: 125 Bucks

Melee Weapons
Axe: With a wooden handle, custom fit for the character's size, and a single or double bladed head, this is a weapon that can be used for chopping wood or foes. Damage: Small: 2D6, Large: 3D6, Giant-Sized (for creatures Size Level 16 and bigger and requires a P.S. of 26+): 4D6. Note: Hatchet or Throwing axe does only 1D6 damage.
Cost: 30-60 Bucks for a small to medium-sized axe, 100-150 for a large or giant one.
Ball & Chain: A length of chain that ends in a heavy metal ball, just right for the character's Size Level. Damage: 2D4+2.
Cost: 50-90 Bucks
Bullwhip: A whip constructed of braided leather, customized for the character's Size Level. Damage: 2D6.
Cost: 70 to 100 Bucks
Chain: A length of chain, just right for the character's Size Level. Damage: 2D4.
Cost: 20-30 Bucks
Club: A wooden or metal club, reinforced and built accord­ing to the character's Size Level. Damage: 2D4.
Cost: 20 to 40 Bucks
Hammer: Custom made wooden or metal shaft attached to a two-sided hammer designed for combat. Damage: 2D6.
Cost: 35-50 Bucks
Hooves, Metal Shod: Adding a metal shod to a hoof adds +1 to normal damage. See Farrier for costs.
Hooves, Metal Spiked: Adding spiked studs, or horseshoes with spikes, adds +3 to damage from hooves. See Farrier for costs.
Knife: Ordinary fighting knife. Damage: 1D6.
Cost: 15-30 Bucks
Knife, Boot: A short, sharp blade, easy to conceal, which is also balanced for throwing. Damage: 1D4.
Cost: 25 to 50 Bucks
Knife, Bush or Survival: Heavy-duty, all-purpose survival knife, made out of the best steel or composite material. Damage: 2D4.
Cost: 35 to 70 Bucks
Knife, Throwing: Perfectly balanced knife designed for throwing (+1 to strike when thrown only) or hand to hand com­ bat. Damage: 1D6.
Cost: 50 to 75 Bucks
Machete: A flat bladed weapon, useful for cutting brush, leaves or branches, as well as suitable for combat (may be con­sidered a short sword). Damage: 2D4.
Cost: 30 Bucks
Nunchuks: A pair of heavy sticks, joined by a short chain. Requires a separate W.P. (see W.P. Chain for bonuses). Damage: 2D4.
Cost: 20 Bucks
Spear: With a wooden shaft of the right length and thickness for the character's Size Level, and a sharpened metal blade. Damage: 2D6 (1D6 when the blunt end is used rather than the spear blade).
Cost: 20 to 30 Bucks
Staff: Cut and shaped to the size of the owner's hand, with a length a foot taller than the character's height. A good staff is made of a hardened, treated wood that will resist dam­age. Damage: 2D4 for wood and 2D6 for iron.
Cost: 10-30 Bucks wood, 80-120 Bucks iron
Sword, Bastard: A custom-built sword, designed for the character's size and build. Can be wielded with one hand or two. Damage: 2D6+2.
Cost: 120 to 200 Bucks
Sword, Two-Handed/Claymore: No matter how big the character, this weapon is designed to be just a little too big to handle. Damage: 3D6.
Cost: 250 to 500 Bucks
Sword, Saber or Short: A custom-built sword, designed for the character's size and build. Can be wielded with one hand. Damage: 2D4.
Cost: 50-100 Bucks
Attachments
ATB Fantasy Equipment.pdf
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Re: After the Bomb House Rules

Post by Augur »

INTERLUDES

Whereas encounters are largely GM-driven, with the GM presenting players with a situation and then adjudicating their characters’ actions, interludes are largely player-driven. These are segments of downtime in between encounters in the narrative of the game. The most common interludes in game occur during long travel times between destinations or between adventures. An interlude allows characters time to pursue their own interests and goals, to recover from the exertions of their adventures, and to handle the routine tasks of life that get pushed aside in the press of encounters and action time. The process for handling interludes in play is as follows:
  1. The GM informs the players of an interlude, such as, “Your trip to Port Periwinkle is going to take about a week, so you have an interlude.” In some cases, the players can also request an interlude like, “When we arrive at the docks, we want to take some time for an interlude.” The GM decides when an interlude begins, however, since the players may not be aware of the circumstances, such as trouble awaiting them on the station with at least one (if not several!) encounters before they get a break.
  2. The players declare how their characters will spend their time during the interlude. Depending on the length of time available, they may pursue one activity or several, depending on their requirements. The characters may cooperate on some goals or split up for others.
  3. Players and the GM make any necessary tests for the characters’ declared activities to see how they progress or succeed, or not. Some interlude activities require no test so long as there is sufficient time, while others need a test to see if they are successful and, if so, to what degree.
  4. Once all character activities during the interlude are resolved, the GM declares the end of the interlude and begins the next encounter. By definition, an encounter always follows an interlude; two or more interludes simply add up to a single, longer interlude with more options for activities.
Generally, it is common to insert an interlude between the end of one episode and the beginning of the next. The GM should decide whether to play out the interlude as the end of the episode or the start of the next, as time and circumstances allow. You can even play out the interlude during the time between game sessions, with the players and the GM communicating via Discord or other means, so at the start of the next game, the interlude is already concluded and play jumps right into the next encounter.

Types of Interlude Activities

ADVANCEMENT
During the interlude, you spend time consolidating an advancement within an organization.
REQUIREMENTS
You must have received an advancement in membership as a reward prior to the start of the interlude.
RESOLUTION
This requires a skill check only if the GM feels it is needed to close the deal of an award of advancement in position, in which case it should generally be a social skill oriented check unless the organization prizes some other ability you can use to demonstrate your worthiness. The skill check's success threshold should reflect your already existing value to the organization.

MAINTENANCE
You make sure things are functioning properly.
REQUIREMENTS
You need the necessary tools, parts, and equipment. If you’re lacking them, or they are of poor quality, the GM may say your maintenance work takes longer or is less effective.
RESOLUTION
Usually, no skill check is required, although the GM may require a character to have the appropriate skills to do the work, and sufficient time and resources. (All ammo is replenished & basic damage repaired.)

MAKING OR FIXING
You spend time making or fixing something.
REQUIREMENTS
You need the necessary materials and necessary tools and equipment. If you are lacking in the latter, the GM may apply a penalty to the skill check. If you are fixing rather than building something, the skill check will be unmodified.
RESOLUTION
Make a skill check using the appropriate skill. The GM determines the success threshold and number of required interludes for completion based on the item’s complexity. Lower the success threshold by as much as half for fixing something rather than building it from scratch. The GM can adjust this based on the extent of the repairs needed. Each roll represents 6 hours of work. When you reach the threshold, the item is complete.

RECOVERING
Sometimes, you need to spend an interlude, perhaps even several, recovering from the results of your prior encounters.
REQUIREMENTS
While recovering, the character needs to engage in only light activity: resting, reading, conversation, and so forth. No other activities can be undertaken during the same interlude while recovering.
RESOLUTION. No skill checks are necessary to recover from S.D.C. injuries. For Hit Point (or the last 30% of a being's M.D.C.) recovery, you can make a First Aid or comparable check to recover half of your lost H.P. during this interlude. If you are under medical care, your physician can make a skill check. If successful, you will recover all H.P. damage during this interlude. If recovery conditions are less than ideal, the GM may add modifiers to the skill check.

RELATING
You take time to get to know someone better, or to change the nature of your relationship.
REQUIREMENTS
Relating only requires time and someone willing to relate to you, or given no choice but to do so by circumstances. At the GM’s discretion, you might need to at least get someone else to a neutral attitude toward you in a social encounter before you can really relate to them during an interlude.
RESOLUTION
No skill check is required. You just take time to either change your relationship with someone, or to establish or strengthen an existing bond. The GM determines how long this takes: It might be anywhere from a heartfelt conversation for an hour or two to spending days or even longer together.

REPUTATION
You live up to your reputation, or create a new one for yourself.
REQUIREMENTS
Either an existing reputation to maintain or a new one you are aiming for.
RESOLUTION
You spend time doing things in accordance with your reputation in order to maintain it; reputations and fame can be fleeting, and a known pattern of behavior can reinforce them. Exactly what depends on your reputation, but during an interlude it is often making your actions known in some way, whether it is giving an interview to the authorities or flexing your influence in the presence of your peers. In some cases, the GM may require a skill check to measure the effectiveness of your efforts. You can likewise do things counter to a current reputation in order to try and rid yourself of it, or something new in order to gain a new reputation. The GM decides when it is appropriate to drop an old reputation or to award you a new one.

RESEARCHING
You spend time looking up (or digging for) information.
REQUIREMENTS
You need access to sources of information, usually access to a particular guild or library of physical media, although some research might also require specific sources of data or even subjects of study, such as biological or material samples.
RESOLUTION
Make an appropriate skill check modified based on how obscure or difficult to find the information you’re looking for is. Each skill check represents 4 hours of work. The GM sets the success threshold for when you find what you’re looking for. Optionally, the GM can set multiple thresholds, each revealing a particular piece of information about the subject, until you have found out everything there is to know about it.

SHOPPING
You spend time finding and acquiring new weapons & equipment.
REQUIREMENTS
You need sufficient funds to acquire the things you seek. You also need the appropriate venue for the acquisition of such an item. While a waterskin might be so ubiquitous as to be considered universally available (or nearly so), a master-crafted longsword or item of lostech may not be so. The GM determines what is available and where based on the canon of the setting & his discretion.
RESOLUTION
Some items may require skill checks to obtain due to their limited availability. A list of what is sought after for purchase is provided by the player. The GM then determines the number of successful skill checks necessary based on the least available item in the list. The player then performs those skill checks. What is available & successfully acquired will reflect the success & number of those skill checks.
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Re: After the Bomb House Rules

Post by Augur »

After The Bomb Perception Modifiers

Advanced Hearing: +15%
Advanced Smell: +15%
Advanced Taste: +10%
Advanced Touch: +5 to perceiving any tactile characteristics
Advanced Vision: +5%
Color Blindness: -10%
Danger Sense (Psi): +10% when active
Ears, Vestigial: +5%
Extraordinary Intelligence: +5%
Nearsighted: -15% to anything beyond 60'
Nightvision: +10% when in darkness
Nocturnal Metabolism: same as Nightvision (not cumulative)
Prey Eyes: -15% to anything within 60' in front, +10% otherwise
Sonar: +15% underwater
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Re: After the Bomb House Rules

Post by Augur »

4.10.2022 Update
If a character has partial speech, he must include a language skill check in each post in which he speaks...even if it's telepathic speech. By the same token, any character without the ability to speak, and no language known to do so, is going to have a VERY hard time as a useful team member in a player character group, so it's STRONGLY encouraged that all player characters have some manner in which to communicate effectively.

4.13.2022 Update
Speech: None grants Sign Language at 88% (+1%/level). Of course a creature in this category would need arms/hands in order to make this sort of skill check.

Code: Select all

Sign Language 88% [size=85](+1%)[/size]
Speech: Partial grants Native Language at 44% (+1%/level). It is supposed to be difficult to understand from time to time. All characters with this type of speech must include a language skill check in each post in which he speaks, but are encouraged to come up with creative ways to write dialog in more animalistic utterances.

Code: Select all

Native Language at 44% [size=85](+1%)[/size]
Speech: Full grants Native Language at 88% (+1%/level)

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Native Language at 88% [size=85](+1%)[/size]
Telepathic Transmission grants Native Language at 88% (+1%/level) within the written limitations of the power.

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Native Language at 88% [size=85](+0%)[/size]
4.19.2022 Update
Skill challenges removed.
5.4.2022 Update
Gold Piece to Bucks conversion rate noted. Carts & Wagons added to Equipment.
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